Devolution—meaning the decentralization of power—is the geopolitical equivalent of the second law of thermodynamics

Devolution helps to sensibly reorganize large and unwieldy post-colonial states.  [..] As state boundaries better conform to ethnic and linguistic boundaries, provincial units can focus more on their internal growth, rather than on having to defend themselves against the center.

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Another accelerant of devolution is ubiquitous data. Call it the triumph of transparency: Whether through free media, leaks, hacks, democracy, or legal pressure, people increasingly know how their countries are run—and crucially how their money is spent. 

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Even global warming can drive devolution: As Greenland’s ice sheet melts, its 60,000 Inuit have greater access to abundant and valuable reserves of resources such as uranium and natural gas.

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Shrill warnings against devolution ignore the evidence that it is also a logical consequence of connectivity. 

Angeliki KapoglouComment